Directed Genome Sequencing: the Key to Deciphering the Fabric of Life in 1993

Seeing the #AAASmtg hashtag flowing on my twitter stream over the last few days reminded my that my former post-doc advisor Sue Celniker must be enjoying her well-deserved election to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Sue has made a number of major contributions to Drosophila genomics, and I personally owe her for the chance to spend my journeyman years with her and so many other talented people in the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project. I even would go so far as to say that it was Sue’s 1995 paper with Ed Lewis on the “Complete sequence of the bithorax complex of Drosophila” that first got me interested in “genomics.” I remember being completely in awe of the Genbank accession from this paper which was over 300,000 bp long! Man, this had to be the future. (In fact the accession number for the BX-C region, U31961, is etched in my brain like some telephone numbers from my childhood.) By the time I arrived at BDGP in 2001, the sequencing of the BX-C was already ancient history, as was the directed sequencing strategy used for this project.  These rapid changes made discovery of a set of discarded propaganda posters collecting dust in Reed George’s office that were made at the time (circa 1993) extolling the virtues of “Directed Genome Sequencing” as the key to “Deciphering the Fabric of Life” all the more poignant. I dug a photo I took of one of these posters today to commemerate the recognition of this pioneering effort (below). Here’s to a bygone era, and hats off to pioneers like Sue who paved the road for the rest of us in (Drosophila) genomics!

Directed-genome-sequencing

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