Nominations for the Benjamin Franklin Award for Open Access in the Life Sciences

Earlier this week I recieved an email with the annual call for nominations for the Benjamin Franklin Award for Open Access in the Life Sciences. While I am in general not that fussed about the importance of acadamic accolades, I think this a great award since it recognizes contributions in a sub-discipne of biology — computational biology, or bioinformatics — that are specifically done in the spririt of open innovation. By placing the emphasis on recognizing openness as an achievement, the Franklin Award goes beyond other related honors (such as those awarded by the International Society for Computational Biology) and, in my view, captures the essence of the true spirit of what scientists should be striving for in their work.

In looking over the past recipients, few would argue that the award has not been given out to major contributors to the open source/open access movements in biology. In thinking about who might be appropriate to add to this list, two people sprang to mind who I’ve had the good fortune to work with in the past, both of whom have made a major impresion on my (and many others’) thinking and working practices in computational biology.  So without further ado, here are my nominations for the 2012 Benjamin Franklin Award for Open Access in the Life Sciences (in chronological order of my interaction with them)…

Suzanna Lewis

Suzanna Lewis (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) is one of the pioneers of developing open standards and software for genome annotation and ontologies. She led the team repsonsible for the systematic annotation of the Drosophila melanogaster genome, which included development of the Gadfly annotation pipeline and database framework, and the annotation curation/visualization tool Apollo. Lewis’ work in genome annotation also includes playing instrumental roles in the GASP community assessement exercises to evaluate the state of the art in genome annotation, development of the Gbrowser genome browser, and the data coordination center for modENCODE project. In addition to her work in genome annotation, Lewis has been a leader in the development of open biological ontologies (OBO, NCBO), contributing to the Gene Ontology, Sequence Ontology, and Uberon anatomy ontologies, and developing open software for editing and navigating ontologies (AmiGO, OBO-Edit, and Phenote).

Carole Goble

Carole Goble (University of Manchester) is widely recognized as a visionary in the development of software to support automated workflows in biology. She has been a leader of the myGrid and Open Middleware Infrastructure Institute consortia, which have generated a large number of highly innovative open resources for e-research in the life sciences including the Taverna Workbench for developing and deploying workflows, the BioCatalogue registry of bioinformatics web services, and the social-networking inspired myExperiment workflow repository. Goble has also played an instrumental role in the development of semantic-web tools for constructing and analyzing life science ontologies, the development of ontologies for describing bioinformatics resources, as well as ontology-based tools such as RightField for managing life science data.

I hope others join me in acknowledging the outputs of these two open innovators as being more than worthy of the Franklin Award, support their nomination, and cast votes in their favor this year and/or in years to come!

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